Next Meeting - May 11th

Cape Cod Bird Club monthly meetings are held September – May.

Our next meeting is May 11th at 7:30 pm at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History on Route 6A in Brewster.

Blair Nikula – “The Cape Cod Lake and Pond Waterfowl Survey”

See our Meetings page for more information about the topic and speaker.

Check out our Walks page for upcoming bird walks led by club members, which are held throughout the year.

Cape Cod Bird Festival

Cape Cod Bird Festival Logo

3rd Annual

Cape Cod Bird Festival

September 18 – September 20, 2015
Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Registration Now Open!

Click here to find out how

Here are our Special Guest Speakers for the 2015 Festival:

Dr. Miyoko ChuFriday’s speaker will be Dr. Miyoko Chu author of Songbird Journeys, the riveting tale of the wonders of bird migration. ”Songbird Journeys: Four Seasons in the Lives of Migratory Birds”

Richard Crossley

 

Saturday’s speaker will be Richard Crossley, internationally acclaimed birder, photographer and award winning author of the popular ‘The Crossley ID Field Guides’.

Past, Present and Future

 

For more information, see the Bird Festival pages

The 2014 Cape Cod Bird Festival is history, but here is a brief wrap-up of the event, and a list of birds seen.

Camp Edwards Grassland Bird Tours, Open to the Public, Registration Required

The Massachusetts Army National Guard’s Natural Resource Program is hosting grassland bird tours in May and June 2015 on Camp Edwards. This is an unusual opportunity for avid birders, naturalists and photographers to walk through the Camp Edwards grasslands on a guide-lead tour.

There are several hundred acres of grassland managed on Camp Edwards at Joint Base Cape Cod. This thriving habitat, a rarity in the rest of Massachusetts, is home to a variety of grassland bird species including four state-listed species: Upland Sandpiper, Northern Harrier, Grasshopper Sparrow and the Vesper Sparrow.

Other bird species you may encounter are the Clay Colored Sparrow, Northern Bobwhite, Meadowlark, and many Bluebirds. Additional information on the grassland habitat is available at www.E&RC.org.

Each tour will cover approximately 137 acres of this rare and endangered habitat and will last around two hours. Attendees should bring sunscreen, tick protection, and water. Don’t forget your binoculars and camera. Photography is encouraged.

Tour Dates and Registration Information:

Each tour is limited to 25 people and spots will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Tour dates and times are:

Saturday, May 30, from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m.; registration deadline is Thursday, May 21

Saturday, June 13, from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m.; registration deadline is Friday, June 5

Children over 10 years of age are welcome on the tour.

To register for a tour, please send an email to emily.d.kelly2.nfg@mail.mil, with your name, telephone number, and which tour date you would like. A confirmation email will be sent with further information including directions, base access, meeting place and parking.

Accessing Camp Edwards on Joint Base Cape Cod:

Please remember, Camp Edwards is a restricted access facility and attendees must be registered to access the base.  All attendees will be asked to provide their full names, driver’s license number and date of birth to complete the registration process.

Spring 2015 Kingfisher Newsletter now available online

Kingfisher Banner

The latest edition of the club’s newsletter “The Kingfisher” is now available online here and on the Newsletters page.

In addition, there are now copies of Cape Cod Bird Club newsletters from 1985 to 1996, and 2007 to the present.  Eventually we hope to have all available printed copies of the newsletter online.

Live Nest Cams

Great Horned Owlets in Savannah, GA

Great Horned Owlets and parent in Savannah, GA

It’s a fun time of year to observe live nest box cams, and Cornell has several:

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/46/Great_Horned_Owls/  – probably won’t be active too much longer, as the two young are now old enough to start “branching”, but one seems to stay in the nest a lot, and was fed there this morning.  You can even view the nest at night, as they have infrared cameras.

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/42/Barn_Owls/ – the pair were at the box this morning, but there may not be eggs yet.

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/43/Barred_Owls/ – the adult is on the nest with eggs.

They have feeder cams, too.

The osprey cam at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History doesn’t appear to be active yet. you have to view a brief ad to get to the live view

Falcon: http://rfalconcam.com/rfc-main/streamView.php – you have to view a brief ad to get to the live view

Audubon Live: http://projectpuffin.audubon.org/audubon-live-cams – a little early yet for the puffins, terns and guillemots, but there is a recording of a Seal Island cam where you can watch a gray seal giving birth.

Bluebird Time!

It’s spring and bluebirds should be checking out nestboxes soon!  CCBC volunteers monitor Eastern Bluebird nestbox trails in several locations on the Cape.  This is your invitation to get involved and enjoy.  Our monitoring helps bluebirds and other native cavity-nesting species succeed.  To make a difference we need a cadre of volunteers who rotate the duties of monitoring, so you may be asked to monitor about one week a month during the spring and summer.

CCBC manages nestbox trails at Crowes Pasture in East Dennis, and at Thompson’s Field, Bank Street Bogs and Texeira Field in Harwich.  We train volunteers, clean out and set up boxes for the spring, and schedule visits to each site so that we can track the nesting cycles of the birds.  This involves some walking over uneven terrain, peeking inside each box and recording what is happening:  nest building activity, adult sitting on eggs, young waiting to be fed or fledging time.  If you are interested in helping, please email one of our coordinators.

For Crowes Pasture, Carolyn Kennedy, c2kenn2@verizon.net (508) 255-7564.

For Harwich, contact Judith Bruce, turtledock@comcast.net.

If you have boxes at home, it is time to clean them out in March.

Election Of Officers At Annual Meeting In May

At our Annual Meeting in May, we will elect Four Officers and Three Directors.

The Candidates are:

President (one year term): Charles Martin
Vice-President (one year term): Paula Pariseau
Secretary (one year term): Peter Flood
Treasurer (one year term): Fran Ziegler

Director, Trip Coordinator (to fill a term that expires 2016): Stefanie Paventy
Director, Program (3-year term expiring 2018): Mark Faherty
Director, Refreshments (3-year term expiring 2018): Jane Martin

Anyone seeking office may be nominated from the floor during the meeting

Support the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program!

Support the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program!

A critical part of the funding equation for the MA Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program are your voluntary contributions on your Massachusetts state income tax form.  If you care about the future of our wildlife and wild places here in Massachusetts, please contribute.

For more information about how you can help, click here.

Rusty Blackbird Blitz

The Rusty Blackbird Migration Blitz was initiated in 2014 and was in response to the dramatic and mysterious decline documented for this species over the last several decades.  The project is a collaborative, citizen science effort by many individuals and conservation organizations and is coordinated by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  The project challenges birders to scour the landscape for Rusty Blackbirds during this species’ northward migration.  Last year, between 1 March and 15 June, 4750 birders submitted 13,400 checklists containing Rusty Blackbird observations to eBird, a hugely successful first season that has allowed us to start looking at potential Rusty Blackbird migratory hotspots, habitat use, and potential migratory pathways.

To find out more, and learn how to participate, read the letter from Andrew Vitz, Ph.D., State Ornithologist, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, click here.

 

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Migration Progress

In the spring you can see hummingbird migration progress at http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html.